Friday, May 27, 2016

Studio lighting

In a perfect world every artist has a large studio with windows facing north. But since this isn't a perfect world my studio is pretty small and has windows on the north-east. I work at home, so we kinda live in the studio. A few years back I worked in the studio of an absent friend for about a year. Lots of room and the light was great. I got on my bike every day and drove there with my lunch box. After a few months I felt like I was going to work... It was a productive year though, but I didn't mind going back to my home studio.

Anyway, windows facing north-east. That means the morning sun shines directly into the studio and that's pretty annoying, in particular when I'm working on the wall easel. I have to block the sun with a curtain and that means less light. Additional lighting is a necessity. Normal fluorescent tubes are to blue and light bulbs are to yellow. A fellow painter gave me a valuable tip: True-light natural daylight lamps. I bought five true-light tubes, et voila, problem solved. I can paint under any circumstance, even at night if I wanted to, which I don't.




On the easel the painting I've been working on for the past few weeks. If you want to see the final result, please go to my website. On the wall to the right the preparatory oil sketch on paper. Outside the lilacs in full bloom. Not bad, eh?

10 comments:

  1. Great to see a shot of your space along with the lighting. So many artists, including myself at times, complain about their working conditions, especially the lighting. It's sobering and instructive to see what great work can be done under sub-optimal conditions. Love the new painting!

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    1. Sub-optimal conditions, I like that word. I've painted in rooms less suited and still enjoyed myself. You can paint in your attic, if necessary :) Good to hear you like the new painting, David. Thanks!

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  2. WOW - I can smell those lilacs all the way across the Atlantic Ocean! Your studio looks so peaceful, and that painting on the wall is super exquisite.

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    1. They smell good, don't they? Thanks for the compliments on my latest painting!

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  3. Art happens no matter what,unconditionally...i am using still porch south side no windows or doors))just refreshing breeze salt wind from the gulf instead of conditioner( i am at Florida)and i got used to it and even love it...would be terrible to have no any place at all...As they said-whatever you go there you are...Your studio looks very cozy ,virtually i see a steaming cup hot tea in it with danish cookis on tray next to imac)))

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    1. I almost feel a little jealous, Arthur. Painting in the Gulf breeze... Still, I'm very content with my studio, my Danish cookies and my cup of tea.

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  4. Hi Jahn, could you please tell me what kind of paper and board you use? I suppose the paper must be able to stand up to all that stippling. Also, what program do you use to edit your photos? I have a few of your lessons and what an excellent opportunity they provide to learn from a master. Thanks!




    use to edit your photos? I must say the videos are an excellent way to learn watching over the shoulder of a master.Fantastic!

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    1. I paint on 6 mil MDF board. If you want to prepare it yourself, you may want to read the January 2015 article I wrote about it on my blog.
      For my oil sketches I use an oil pad I buy online, nothing fancy. I stick it to a piece of board with double sided tape. Stippling is no problem then.
      To edit my photos I use Photoshop elements. Relatively cheap and it does everything I need it to do.

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  5. Beautiful! Warm greetings from Montreal, Canada. :)

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    1. Thank you, Linda. Warm greetings from a chilly Holland!

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